Auction 25 /
Lot262

262  From

277

262

Rare publication on the custom of beating Haman in the Diaspora. Tel Aviv 1947

Opening price: $150

Commission: 23%

Sold: $160
00
Days
00
Hours
00
Minutes
00
Seconds
Days
Hours
Minutes
Seconds
04.08.2024 07:00pm

Haman beating customs Diasporas of Israel, by Yom Tov Levinsski. Tel Aviv, Purim 1947 - only edition published by the Hebrew Society for Peoples Knowledge. Countless customs of beating Haman during Purim and the days leading up to it in all the Diasporas of Israel worldwide. Rare.

A rare and comprehensive publication on customs of blotting Haman during Purim in the Jewish Diasporas around the world. The author details countless customs of blotting Haman during Purim in Jewish communities in France and Ashkenaz, Italy, Egypt, Algeria, Yemen, the Netherlands, and other lands: burning an effigy of Haman on Purim, pounding stones inscribed with the name "Haman", pounding with hammers, the "משוורתא דפוריא" custom in Eastern countries where the boys would hang an effigy of Haman on rooftops for five days, and on Purim make a bonfire and throw the effigy in while the boys stand around happily dancing, eradicating Haman custom in the custom of Damascus where they would place an effigy near the synagogue on Purim made from rags and actually shoot it with rifles and unsheathed swords, the "משוורתא" custom in Yemen where the boys would hang an effigy of Haman in the synagogue courtyard and throw arrows and stones at it until it shattered to pieces, and the Yemenite custom of placing Haman on a wooden horse with four legs and placing an effigy of Haman atop it and singing it a derisive song in Yemenite, and more. The author also details various customs related to saying "Arur Haman" in different lands and customs of blotting Haman in various ways: the custom of striking Haman and its origins, the custom of eating an effigy shaped cake practiced in Turkey, the wall-pounding custom practiced in Regensburg, the custom of hanging Haman on a tree in Algeria, the "Damages Ketubbah" custom practiced in Spanish communities to paint in honor of Haman's wedding opening with the words "and in Shushan the Jews killed...", the "funeral for Haman" custom practiced in Kurdistan, the origins of the Grager for Purim in Jewish communities, the stomping, stick-beating, stone-pounding and hammer-pounding customs, the "Kleppel" ("Haman's hammer") used to strike Haman in Ashkenaz lands, the Yemenite and Damascus customs of actually firing rifles at the Haman statue until it fell, striking Haman with an iron bar on stone in Lithuania, striking Haman by igniting an exploding candle in Germany, the Frankfurt community custom of lighting two wax candles, one against Haman and one against Zeresh, letting them burn out, the "Haman's revenge" in Tehran's community - hanging a giant effigy of Haman, the tablet clacking custom in Poland - two wooden tablets specially constructed for the custom's observance, distributing small hammers to children in Rhodes while reading the Megillah, striking Haman with "שליסלעך" in Russia, tin-pounding in Mohyliv, firing planks in Vilna, the chassidic custom in Zhetel (beating a large tin box), striking Haman with a "Grager" in Kishinev, casting Haman's effigy in the river in Chernivtsi (they would create a life-sized effigy of Haman and sink it in the river), the festival of hanging and burning Haman in Tunis, the sneezing plague in Jerusalem (distributing snuff near the cantor reading the Megillah, causing him to sneeze repeatedly and reread those pesukim distortedly until ceasing to sneeze and succeeding in reading them properly), the "Timkhe" custom in Afghanistan (striking Haman with special hammers prepared specifically for Purim), and many other customs for blotting Haman on Purim.

The book is accompanied by rare charts of Haman-striking objects from different collections.

[2], 89 p. Minor tears on front cover and corners of first two pages (without damage to text). Good condition.

More items

Ask about the item

262. Rare publication on the custom of beating Haman in the Diaspora. Tel Aviv 1947